Meghan and Harry’s son Archie to be given new title when Charles is king

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry's son will become a prince as soon as Charles becomes King.

Baby Archie Harrison Mountbatten-Windsor is currently not a prince, but will technically become one when his grandad becomes King, reports Express.

When Prince Charles becomes the King of England, although Archie will be a prince – at the age of 18 he will be allowed to decide his title, which could be either Prince Archie or His Royal Highness.

Although his parents, Meghan and Harry have stepped down as senior members of the Royal Family and no longer use their titles.

Meghan and Prince Harry's decision to ditch their roles as senior royals was in part motivated by their wish to give Archie a "more peaceful life."

While the doting parents did not give Archie a royal title following his birth, he is still seventh in line to the throne and will move up the line of succession when his grandfather Prince Charles, 71, becomes king.

However, even if Archie decides against using his HRH style, there is still a chance he will be subject to a royal law surrounding marriage, one royal expert has claimed.

According to a constitutional expert, the 2013 Succession of the Crown Act which rules that royals who are sixth in line to the throne and above must ask the presiding monarch for permission to marry, is likely to apply to Archie one day.

Expert Iain MacMarthanne explained Archie is likely to be subject to the same royal rule as his cousins – Prince George, Princess Charlotte and Prince Louis.

He told Express.co.uk: "Prior to the Succession of the Crown Act 2013 all descendants of George II, under the terms of the Royal Marriages Act 1772, unless the issue of a princess who had married into a foreign royal family, had to obtain the sovereign’s permission to marry in order to retain their rights in succession.

"The 2013 Act sought to bring multiple pieces of outdated and discriminatory legislation relating to the monarchy up to date."

Source: Read Full Article